Define “highly effective” teacher…if you can!

Do test scores define a great “highly effective” teacher? Or a willingness to attend trainings? Teach summer school? Or merely have a personality compatible with the current principal? Is it even possible to define under the RISE evaluation?

Advertisements

Where is the Common Core for principals?

Okay…I don’t actually want Stepford principals any more than I want Stepford students. The varied personalities and abilities add flavor to any classroom. However, the EXPECTATIONS of principals are often so varied and even contradictory from one principal to the next, it can leave me wondering if I have any idea at all of how to do my job! How often do you get a new principal? How do you adapt? Should we become Stepford teachers based on each principal? Or risk a lowered evaluation if the current principal doesn’t like all the wonderful things that last year’s principal commended you for? 

Keeping my chin up…or at least trying!

It’s that stressful time of year when it seems (at least for me) that school staff is in self-preservation mode. Testing is mostly over and the only remaining mission is to claim full credit for successes and point fingers at others for “failures”. Lately, I have felt that finger pointing at me so much, that I, too, have succumbed to this self-destructive tactic. Why does it even matter when summer break is close enough to touch? Mostly because I am passionate about what I do and the lives I have touched over the past year. So it hurts because I’m being blamed for all the less-than-flattering aspects of my school community and waiting patiently for a single attagirl. My attagirl will have to come from within myself, as it should anyway. But in the meantime, why am I feeling like I am getting full credit for all that is wrong in my building? Am I THAT good??? 

Introduction

Welcome Colleagues and Friends of Educators! We are a group of passionate, but frustrated teachers that are providing a communication, advocacy, and support platform, with the goal of helping to overcome the barriers to children receiving a quality education. Historically, teachers were held in high esteem by most. Unfortunately, present-day teachers’ struggles more closely resemble the oppressive, threatening, substandard experiences of “slaves”. Our question is, “What can be done to help remind teachers to value themselves and each other; to create more positive interpersonal relations between school staff; to empower teachers and school staff to take a stand (for children) when needed; and to make children’s well-being and education our main focus.” There must be another way…